Cervical Cancer Survival Rates
Survival Prognosis By Cervix Cancer Stage

Chances of surviving cervix cancer

Cervical Cancer Survival Stats

Cervical Cancer Survival Rates

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What Are My Chances Of Surviving?
5 Year Survival Rate By Stage


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Cervical Cancer

What Are My Chances Of Surviving?

This is naturally the first question any patient who has just received a cervical cancer diagnosis will want answered. The survival rate is also the most common way for a doctor to discuss prognosis (outcome).Cancer survival statistics are usually presented as a 5 year prognosis. They refer to the likelihood of surviving the first 5 years after diagnosis. Of course many of those people live much longer than 5 years and may even be cured. Below is list of the 5 year survival rate for cervical cancer according to the stages of cervical cancer.

Cervix Cancer 5-Year Survival Rates

Stage: 0
CIS (carcinoma in situ) or CIN. Pre-cancer stage.
Survival Rate: 93 percent

Stage: 1A
Carcinoma not visible to the eye but seen under a microscope.
Survival Rate: 93 percent

Stage: IB
Lesions are growing larger. Symptoms of cervical cancer will usually occur at this stage.
Survival Rate: 80 percent

Stage: 2A
Cancer invades the vagina but has not yet spread to the tissues next to the cervix (parametria). There is a higher risk of cervical cancer recurrence in stage IB and 2.
Survival Rate: 63 percent

Stage: 2B
Cancer has invaded the parametria.
Survival Rate: 58 percent

Stage: 3A
Cancer has spread to the lower third of the vagina but does not extend to the pelvic wall.
Survival Rate: 35 percent

Stage: 3B
Cancer has invaded the walls of the pelvis or it has spread to the pelvis lymph nodes but not other parts of the body.
Survival Rate: 32 percent

Stage: 4A
Cancer has spread to the rectum or bladder.
Survival Rate: 16 percent

Stage: 4B
Cancer has spread beyond the pelvic region to the bones, lungs, heart or liver.
Survival Rate: 15 percent

Figures are based on women diagnosed between 2000 and 2002 from the National Cancer Database.

These statistics are only an indication of how a large number of people responded to cervical cancer treatment - they cannot predict how any one individual will respond to treatment or what their life expectancy will be. Everyone's cancer is unique. The same type of cancer can grow at different rates in different women. Individual factors which could affect a woman's outcome of cancer of the cervix include her general health and age. In fact doctors have a way of grading how well a patient is and they call it 'performance status'. A performance status (PS) of 0 means the patient is overall quite fit and healthy and able to look after themselves. If the cancer is more advanced and the patient is tired, has lost weight or is in pain, they will need more day to day health and the PS will be at least 1.

Worldwide Survival Rates

According to a health report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in 2011 they found that on average, worldwide, 66 percent of women diagnosed with cervical cancer were alive after 5 years. In Europe Ireland has one of the lowest survival rates (57 percent) which may be representative of the fact they only rolled out national screening (Pap tests) in 2008, 20 years after many other Western countries. Norway, which has an extensive screening program for example, has a 78 percent survival rate. Read about recommended screenings for women.

Compare Survival Rates With Other Gynecologic Cancers
Breast Cancer Survival Rate
Uterus Cancer Survival Rates
Fallopian Tube Cancer Survival Rates
Ovarian Cancer Survival Rates
Vulva Cancer Survival Rates

Vaginal Cancer Survival Rates

  Related Articles on Cancer of The Cervix

For more cancer details and prognosis, see the following:

Cervical Cancer Prevention
Causes of Cervical Cancer
Leading Cause Of Death In Women

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